Andrew Jackson's Economic Policy

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Andrew Jackson was brought up through humble beginnings and hardships throughout his lifetime, starting out as the son of poor Irish immigrants to becoming the seventh president of the United States in 1828. Andrew Jackson supported the run-of-the-mill man, drawing his support away from the policies and treaties that supported the wealthy. Jackson did everything in his power to revolutionize the “common man” and give them the most support. Jackson’s policies were criticized throughout the nation, earning him a very questionable spot in history. While some may argue that Andrew Jackson supported the “common man” and tried to do what was best for the majority of the nation, his economic policies and his treatment towards the Native Americans…show more content…
The Indian Removal Act was the movement of about 16,543 Native Americans across the nation’s land to create more farming space for crops necessary for the survival of the american people. Andrew Jackson had moved tribes such as the Choctaw, Creek, Seminole, Chickasaw and Cherokee, also known as the five civilized tribes, west of the Mississippi River. Jackson’s rebuttal for the removal of the Natives consisted of telling the people that moving the Indians would separate them from the white settlements, free them from the power of the states, and would stop their extinction. Unfortunately, Jackson had created a path of death for the remaining Indians that would not give up their land willingly. He then used armies of men to push out the leftover tribes. Jackson’s forceful tactics against the natives resulted in a total of about 2,000-6,000 deaths, renaming the movement “The Trail of Tears”. Another example of Jackson’s favoritism towards the common man was during the destruction of the National Bank. The National Bank was a place for federal funds and paid national debts, but only benefited the stockholders of the bank, i.e. the wealthy, and not the common man. Jackson wanted to destroy the national bank because of the fact that it didn 't help the commoners, so he decided to redirect federal deposits from the national bank into…show more content…
During his presidency, Jackson had appointed his friends or “common men” into office to replace other appointed government officials. Many people think that Jackson was trying to modernize the office by replacing the wealthy, but his plan backfired on him. These actions of Jackson are now known as the Spoils System. One of Jackson’s appointees, Samuel Swartwout, was a collector customs for the port of New York. During his time serving, Swartwout stole a total of over 1,000,000 dollars from Washington (which was the first time an official had stolen that much money). Jackson’s plan backfired, and the Spoils System was denounced as
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