Andy Dufresne's The Shawshank Redemption

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It is no mystery to mankind that world in which we live in is far from flawless. Political figures have become submerged in corruption, taking bribes to promote self-gain. The justice system, in which we sanction so greatly, is eager to either look away or wrongly accuse individuals as they see fit. A victim of this indecency is Andy Dufresne, The Shawshank Redemption’s main protagonist. To clarify, Dufresne was a prominent banker who had just discovered his wife’s unfaithful actions with another man. Coincidentally, the wife and her lover are then found dead, riddled with numerous bullet holes. The Shawshank Redemption picks up here, commencing with Mr. Dufresne’s unfortunate court hearing. With substantial evidence and a swayed audience,…show more content…
This process of resocialization allows some outside forces to properly control the environment of individuals to change their divergent or unstable behavior to confide with society. The Correctional Facility itself is identified as total institution, an isolated place in which people are involuntarily administered to carry out the very process of resocialization. These institutions are primarily occupied with those of whom do not conform to society and are in need of change. Concerning Andy Dufresne himself had contradicted the very concepts of the Conflict Theory; where the wealthy (The Warden and staff in this case) use their power to exploit the poor (Andy and the inmates). The prominent banker’s merit allows him to deviate amongst his fellow inmates. This deviance refers to the defining features of Andy and the very reasons as to why he was treated differently apart from the other prisoners. The functionalist theory is keenly displayed from the character Brooks and his position in prison. This theory advocates the theory that each and every part of society must all harmonize and work together in order to maintain stability within the whole system. Without one element, the system is no longer functioning…show more content…
Brooks, a fifty-year prisoner and institution’s librarian had found his place within the jail. As news of his release emanated, the old and gentle soul of Brooks had become mad with grief and frustration. He had attempted to kill another inmate to augment his sentence; it was clear he did not want to leave. Having been institutionalized the majority of his life, Brook’s occupation as a librarian was the only role he knew. Once he left the prison, Brook’s position held no worth in the real world. Upon his releasement, Brooks experienced a sense of cultural lag the new world outside of prison had, “gotten itself in a big damn hurry.” This transition that was imposed upon Brooks became too overwhelming which would tragically lead to his
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