Animal Farm Book Report

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OHHS AP/Pre-AP English Name: Andy Ayala Period: 3 Major Works Data Sheet Note: Cite references in MLA format, in-text and parenthetically. Complete a Works Cited page of all references used. Title: Animal Farm Author: George Orwell (Eric Arthur Blair) Date of Publication: August 17, 1945 Genre: Satire, dystopia, animal fable, allegory, and fiction Biographical information about the author: Eric Arthur Blair, also known as George Orwell, was born on June 25, 1903 in Motihari, India. Orwell’s father, Richard Blair, was employed in the Indian Civil Service, managing opium fares to Asia. His mother, Ida Blair, on the other hand, was a housewife. Once Orwell turned one year old, his mother packed the children’s bags and moved them to England for…show more content…
In the first place, it is a fable loaded with talking animals and a good moral conclusion about turning into the thing you are battling against. In any case, this is just the main level of a novel that offers astonishing profundity and multifaceted nature for such a short work. The novel likewise also works as an allegory. Each character is representative, speaking to various parts of humankind in their look for heaven. Like a moral story, it gives the audience a lesson about the idea of man. The novel additionally works as political satire. The two pigs, Napoleon and Snowball, re-institute the conflict amongst Stalin and Trotsky, with alternate characters filling in different parts and gatherings of people. Not only that, but the book can also categorized as a general satire, offering the skeptical perception that all animals are equivalent; however, a few creatures are more equivalent than…show more content…
Pilkington to Napoleon shortage of food on the farm. They want to express the procedure of ideological defilement that has been occurring throughout the farm. Mr. Pilkington's witticism exposes the appalling, yet regular condition of workers with creatures. It also establishes the theoretical connection between the oppressed animals and the common workers of the Russian Revolution. 5. “At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn [ . . . .] Napoleon read out the orders for the week in a gruff soldierly style, and after a single singing of Beasts of England, all the animals dispersed.” (Orwell 52) In this quotation, Napoleon utilizes power to seize control. His partners in crime (the puppies) drive off Snowball. Squealer quickly starts to paint Snowball as an adversary who was working with the people. The text reflects Stalin's energy snatch in Russia, yet in addition, demonstrates that one individual will in the long run get control far from the majority. The optimism communicated in Old Major's fantasy is supplanted with a straightforward difference in experts. It anticipates that whatever is left of the novel as the pigs end up noticeably degenerate, acting increasingly like the abhorred
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