Animal Pharmacy Case Study

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In the past few years, the animal pharmacy has been seen as a rising industry in relation to human research and development on medicine. With the neverending process of making sure that the food market such as livestock and with the ongoing notion of treating domestic animals or pets as family members in the household, the animal pharmaceutical industry requires continuous betterment and innovations that will help assess future problems relating to the market and health. Also, as more laws are created in order to address welfare, the more are we inclined to treat these animals the same way we treat other human beings, becoming the reason for us to strive in making this kind of industry a large scale one. However, certain problems that affect…show more content…
Just like with the process of buying food and other products, online modes have been established in order to make it more convenient to the buyers especially those saving of both time and possibly money. In the field of veterinary medications, the introduction of internet pharmacies has given the client the ability to purchase animal medications through the presence of a third party. These online pharmacies tend to grab the attention of buyers through use of business talk and maybe by putting up a website that creates a trustworthy feeling to the buyers. Internet pharmacies may denote better pricing and services such as home delivery, but the medications made available in their websites may be counterfeit, may have exceeded their expiration dates thus reducing or totally negating the effectiveness of the drug itself. These medicines may not contain the real drug or even the prescribed amount of it. The drugs become questionnable in terms of source that may affect both the owners and animals in terms of costing and…show more content…
This creates a real and proper relationship between the veterinarians and the owners so that advice is given sincerely and understood completely. Personal consultations also reveal the identity of the veterinarian himself and the drug that he or she is prescribing is observed more and discussed appropriately. Also, questions inquired by the owner may be answered immediately. This is the same way in the process of human drugs, wherein check-ups or at least known over-the-counter drugs are deemed to be better rather than buying suspicious ones from suspicious sources. Another possible solution is putting emphasis on training for both vendors and customers of drugs, supported by better investigations and better licensing. Licensing would assure a filtered market, one that is not heavily surrounded or proliferated by dubious drugs or such products. Knowledge through special or free classes could also be practiced in order for owners and sellers to be educated in terms of what they are doing in both buying and selling. Lastly, the government could also run free veterinary programs in order for people especially in livestock-prevalent areas such as farms to incline to them and not on to unaccredited types of drugs. Answering this problem of drugs in the animal pharmacy will in the same way affect the
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