Animal Conservation

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There are different strata of living organism: animals, humans, plants and insects. Even though all these divisions are crudely divided into separate categories, it is essential to note that they do no exist independently. There is intricate interaction between all the organisms and the one dialogue that this paper will focus on is between humans and wild animals. Various institutions mediate this conversation, but the ones that directly affect it are: the state, markets and local communities. The aforementioned conversation on conservation is very convoluted and elaborate; it has had long-drawn discussions and has had some of the world’s greatest minds working on it. However, since the issue is so crucial it has not been possible to develop…show more content…
States can be an efficient regulator of markets. They can set up measures like the International Whaling Commission, which put a zero quota on whaling. (Ponting, 167) The state can also help in publicizing conservation issues. A meeting like the Tiger Summit attracts attention and possible funds from interested groups. The government is a key element in ecological issues because more often than not, the projects in question require effort on a Sisyphean scale. Successfully running…show more content…
There are some marginalized communities that have suffered more than others. India still consists of about 196 communities that are directly in contact with nature, that is to say, that some aspect of environment funds their livelihood. One such community is of the Jogi-nath snake charmers. The lives of these snake charmers were directly affected when government put a blanket ban on hunting, poaching and illegal captivity of animals. Their rights were not defended by the state-since they are mostly nomadic in nature-or the conversationalist. The Jogi-nath snake charmers have extensive knowledge of medicinal plants, so they also work as healers in quaint villages and towns. However, their main source of income is now illegal, and they are therefore in constant conflict with the law. These conflicts suggests that the current system is not working and that may be the structure needs a revision. Romulus Whitaker, who coordinated with a community called the Irulas, took one such step. Irulas helped his organization in extracting venom from snakes in the forest to make also anti-venom. Their knowledge of snakes also led to a reduction in the number of snakes being killed, since they could differentiate between poisonous and non-poisonous
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