Anna Wierzbicka Language Analysis

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Anna Wierzbicka (born March 10, 1938 in Warsaw) is a Polish linguist currently working at the Australian National University in Canberra. Brought up in Poland she graduated from Warsaw University and finally emigrated to Australia in 1972, where she has lived until now. With over twenty published books, many of which were translated into foreign languages, she is a prolific writer. Wierzbicka is famous for her work in semantics, pragmatics, and cross-cultural linguistics. She is especially known for Natural Semantic Metalanguage, particularly the concept of semantic primes . Her article Bilingual lives,Bilingual experience is a preface of the book Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development . In this article the author addresses several…show more content…
It happens often that a speaker of two languages to have some hand gestures when speaking a language and other gestures when speaking in a second language. All of these are issues absolutely normal because like I said above language influences the individual to the level of sensory and behavioral. Let’s take for example the experience of Christoph Harbsmeier a multilingual German Sinologue who says in an interview in the French magazine Epok that “‘the influence of language on thought, how we are influenced ... in our ways of being and of feeling by our…show more content…
The more a person knows many categories of concepts specific to each nation, the more it explores larger concepts, emotions, and feelings in the world. The author of the article gives an personal example from her life as a bilingual person : “For example, as I have discussed in a recent focused on the concept of ‘grief’ (Wierzbicka, 2003), Polish has no word for ‘grief’, whereas English has no word for the important Polish concept of ‘nieszcze˛s´cie’, roughly ‘disaster-cum-unhappiness’ (in Russian, nescˇast’e, in French malheur). This means that the same event, for example the death of a loved person, can be interpreted by a speaker of Polish through the conceptual category of ‘nieszcze˛s´cie’ and by the speaker of English through the conceptual category of ‘grief’. Since the way we think about what happens to us is an integral part of the experience, the emotions associated with these different interpretations may also be different. This means that the emotional lives of speakers of different languages (in this case English and Polish) are likely to be different, to some extent. “ One ,can not express a meaning of a word that means something in one language or has a stronger impact in particularly by trying to translate in another language which doesn’t have the same stylistic register as the first language . Second one the first language is most likely to have a greater emotional force than the second language .The author says : “ that experience
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