Anti-Semitism In The 19th Century

450 Words2 Pages
In the Austria Jews could only have one son. In some parts of Europe Jews, had to pay an extra tax and if they did not pay the tax then they could be kick out the country. Jews could not hold certain jobs and could not be in political office. Jews entered into mainstream European society in the 19th century. During the 19th century, it was a time of industrial growth, and social reform. To better gain better legal rights and respect in France, German, and British societies Jews, did away with a lot of their old customs. It looked like at the start of the start of the 19th century the idea of Anti-Semitism was an old idea in history. In Germany and France, the two most infamous “Jew hating” countries, there was hope of things changing. In Germany…show more content…
In the mid-1800s the German Ant-Semitism began to pick up yet again. Germany saw a rise in Ant-Semitism due to two factors, German unification and Zionism. Zionism is the thought of Jews moving back to their homeland in Palestine and creating a new Jewish state. Zionism spread with leader’s trying to bring together Jewish people through speeches and newsletters. Due to Zionism many Germans began to think that Jews want to take over the world. German unity also helped with the rise of Anti-Semitism in the mid-1800s. Before the German people were unified the country did not have a single nation but many different German speaking kingdoms. Nationalist in Germany wanted all the kingdoms to come together and make one big Germany to combat other European super powers such as France, Britain, and Russia. The road to German unification was not easy and when thing became ruff, the German people blamed their problems on the Jews. Wilhelm Marr coined the term Anti-Semitism in his writings titled, The Victory of Judaism over Germanism: Viewed from a Nonreligious Point of View. In Marr’s writings he points out the problem between Jews and Germans. Marr’s write about how his writings are nothing but the screams of pain coming from the oppressed. When Marr writes he talked about how the German people have already lost the battle against the Jews. Marr felt that it was not the Jews fault for
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