Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Rhetorical Analysis

603 Words3 Pages
The wilderness is a great home for many different species of animals to inhabit. Such animals include polar bears, caribou, dall sheeps and wolves. It would be such a tragic that such a great habitat would be demolished. The Arctic National Refuge is a magnificent, and quoted, the last great wilderness. It has been mentioned that the wilderness will be consumed by "a web of roads and pipelines, drilling rigs and industrial facilities". The author uses ethos, logos, and pathos to construct and strengthen his argument, which is that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should not be developed for industry. Jimmy Carter demonstrates the use of ethos to build his argument, which is that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should not be developed for industry. For example, he quoted "Twenty years later, I signed the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, monumental legislation that safeguarded more than 100 million acres of national parks, refuges, and forests in Alaska". The author tries to point out in the quote that Jimmy Carter safeguarded national parks, refuges, and forests in Alaska by signing the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The author depicts the usage of ethos to give Jimmy Carter credibility since the president signs the…show more content…
For instance, he quoted "In 1960, President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the original 8.9 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Range to preserve its unique wildlife, wilderness, and recreational values.". The author says in this quote President Dwight D. Eisenhower made the Arctic National Wildlife Range himself. The author uses logos to express the huge amount of land President Dwight D. Eisenhower established. This relates back to the author's main point, which is that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should not be developed for industry, because former president Jimmy Carter supported the Arctic National Wildlife
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