Are Human Rights Indivisible

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Are Human Rights Universal, Inherent, Inalienable, and Indivisible? Introduction Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible. In Canada, the essence of human rights in the workplace is enhanced by the nation’s capitalist economy where factors of production are held privately by a small portion of the population. In capitalism, there is material inequality due to poor distribution of resources. However, all adults are legal equals by the virtue of being human beings. In this regard, human rights are subjected to every individual in equal measure.…show more content…
In here, the approach is to define key terms and concepts in human rights and legal studies while stating the relationship between them. Secondly, the human rights concept is addressed by focusing on the assertions of being universal, inherent, inalienable and indivisible. In this regard, human rights have been said to be inherent, universal, indivisible and inalienable and this essay provides a discussion leading to the discovery of what each assertion regarding human rights mean. This is done to examine if indeed human rights are universal, inalienable, inherent and indivisible in equal measures without prejudice for any human…show more content…
This is because the principle emphasizes that it is the duty of any government to protect all fundamental freedoms and human rights irrespective of difference in their economic, political or cultural systems. Therefore, this universal declaration adds to the assertion stressing on establishment on which the foundation of the universalizability of human rights through enshrinement of human dignity is being used as a mediating characteristic (Hoover, 2013). This is essential due to the ambiguity in categorization of human rights as universal moral principles and legitimacy in political authorities. However, Teeple (2005) argues that the civilly instituted human rights are relatively uncommon because the key issues addressed focus on the conflict existing between human rights and capitalism instead of focusing on conflicts occurring between the human rights
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