Seven Perspectives On Ethical Theory

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There are seven perspectives on ethical theory: consequentialism, natural law, duty, rights, virtue, instinct, and authority. Each of them relate to morality and decision-making. Some, however, are debated more so than others by their properties and which are best to use when solving problems. Among the perspectives there is one that can be applied the best towards morality and solving problems. Virtue is one of the strongest of the seven perspectives on ethical theory that can be used best to solve problems a society is faced with, based on the premise that this perspective is tied in with the importance of character building, is related to the Golden Mean and Aristotle, has concepts that humans naturally prefer, and is a more natural and…show more content…
Unlike other theories it 's not something one should have to fight for, or earn, or know. One can only get better at it by practicing it. It creates an opportunity to not be selfish and look at how other people act and how they are virtuous and gives you a chance to be more like other people. Emulating others who are virtuous allows for more rational thinking and a better sense in general of doing the right thing. According to an article titled, Virtue Ethics: An Approach to Moral Dilemmas in Nursing, “Virtues are beneficial to human interaction and communication, and to the functioning of human society,” (Arries, 2005). Characteristics of a virtuous person are essential to have in problem solving and allow people to talk to each other. One can be inspired to be good and to pursue the Good by the people around…show more content…
The basis of the theory believes that one who is virtuous, can attain the culmination of humanity and achieve eudaimonia. And solving problems in general is less difficult when the people involved believe in the same goals since those people believe their is always more to be accomplished. Virtue makes people realize that it 's not all about them, and that sometimes it 's about the whole, or the issue, or the Good. It’s bigger than an individual but still allows one to concentrate own their strengths while at the same time working on their weaknesses. Virtue has many elements of other theories, but simply, it is the most natural, the most realistic, and the easiest one to practice. For all these reasons, virtue is one of the strongest of the seven perspectives on ethical theory that can be used best to solve problems a society is faced with, based on the premise that this perspective is tied in with the importance of character building, is related to the Golden Mean and Aristotle, has concepts that humans naturally prefer, and is a more natural and simplistic way of thinking in
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