Arrogance In Frankenstein

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A monster being more human than a human is the intriguing and bold concept that Mary Shelley successfully conveys throughout Frankenstein. As the story progresses a clear shift of protagonists is crafted creating a fascinating yet subtle paradox, that allows the reader to empathise with the monster. This subtle paradox seems to be one of the guiding plotlines that makes this story an excellent reflection of human arrogance. While it may seem difficult to empathize with a hideous murderous monster, the reader is constantly reminded that he was built to be loving and exactly like a human. However, after constantly being corrupted and morally tested by human thinking the monster is led to become aggressive. Because the monster displays human traits…show more content…
This becomes more notable as the story progresses especially when the monster states that his “heart was poisoned with remorse” (Shelley 186). In this vital statement said by the monster, his intense regret for his murders is clearly conveyed. He even goes to the extent to metaphorically hyperbolize his feelings of remorse by stating that they have “poisoned” his heart. He adds on by saying that his heart was “fashioned to be susceptible of love and sympathy” (Shelley 186), which even further supports the idea that the monster truly believes that he was originally intended to have the traits and mindset of a human. However, the rejection brought against him by society destroyed his human traits leading him to murdering people. In contrast to the remorse of the monster, Victor feels only disgust when creating the monster rather than remorse. In hact he claimed that the “beauty of the dream vanished” (Shelley 61). This indicates a rather larger ideology within the story; While Victor constantly displays his disgust and hatred towards the monster, he begins to show less remorse as the story progresses. Obviously, the human reaction to creating a monster that would kill people would be remorse. However Victor lacks this remorse and feels bad for himself for what the monster has done to…show more content…
In addition to his dedication to learn about human culture and the values of society, he also wants to live his life like a human with family, friends, and a partner. This dedication is clear when the monster explains to victor that he loved to see the world from “the views of social life” in reference to the De Lacey's life. He heavily indicates his admiration for human values in this statement. He consistently strived to be polite and morally good in this portion of the book. The monster’s diligence for being human remains a notable aspect of his life throughout the story, however the rejection by society towards him begins to overtake his human nature. David Collings corroborates this view in his Psychoanalytic criticism of Frankenstein by acknowledging that the monster wants to “enter the social world, belong to a family, converse, and have a sexual parOne clearly identifiable human feelings that the monster experiences throughout the novel is remorse for the actions he has taken. This becomes more notable as the story progresses especially when the monster states that his “heart was poisoned with remorse” (Shelley 186). In this vital statement said by the monster, his intense regret for his murders is clearly conveyed. He even goes to the extent to metaphorically hyperbolize his feelings of remorse by stating that they have “poisoned” his heart. He adds on by saying
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