Artemisia Gentileschi's Judith And Holofernes

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Artemisia Gentileschi’s Judith
Artemisia Gentileschi is the most well known Baroque female artist during her era. Her father, Orazio Gentileschi, is also a well know artist and because her father is an artist she is able to have access to early training. Through her father, she is able to meet numerous artists that will help inspire her art works. Caravaggio is one of the artist who mostly inspires her painting techniques the most. Artemisia Gentileschi’s painting of Judith and Holofernes is a reflection of her life. Her art is mostly interpreted through the lens of her rape case. This causes her painting to have events heavy emotions that somehow create dramatic effect to the viewers that creates the difference between male artist such as her father
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He rapes her and promises to marry her in order “to save her reputation” (Guerrilla Girls). During her time, women are criticized for having sex before marriage and when a woman is raped the only way for them to avoid the shame is by marrying their rapist. Artemisia believes his promise of marriage so they continue their relationship. Then, Agostino Tassi reneged on his promise of marriage and Artemisia Gentileschi’s father filed a lawsuit against him followed by a publicized “seven-month trial” that ruined her reputation (Garrard 20). Agostino Tassi denies everything and accuses Artemisia Gentileschi of having intercourse with his friend. After 8 months, Agostino Tassi is released from prison and eventually comes back working for Artemisia’s father (Guerrilla Girls). This has caused trauma to Artemisia that leads to creating impact on her paintings (Christiansen & Mann 310). People assume that Artemisia uses her paintings to seek “revenge to her rapist” as a victim of injustice (Garrard 279). The painting is not only about her rapist but also as an act of “rebellious, antisocial instincts” because instead of getting help from the law, she is questioned and tortured to prove that she is telling the truth

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