Arthur Dimmesdale Character Analysis

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Arthur Dimmesdale was a character with plenteous authority and a vast following from the puritan people which admired him, but he lost all of the power. The sin he committed mentally and physically exhausted himself which consequently lead him body to death. Dimmesdale receives brutal punishment because Nathaniel Hawthorne wanted to use him to teach a moral lesson that sin doesn’t have to be the event that defines how to live a life. Although Dimmesdale fails to move past his sin, Hawthorne presents the reader with an offering that would have free Dimmesdale of his crime to show redemption was still possible. Dimmesdale could not move past the emotional chain of events that were a result of sin, and therefore, he could not live a life of happiness as he did before his crime. Hereafter, Nathaniel Hawthorne portrays Arthur Dimmesdale as the most sinful character. After significant analysis, Dimmesdale is the vehicle that Hawthorne uses to teach the moral lesson that sin does not have to be the…show more content…
Hawthorne chose him to demonstrate a moral throughout the story that sin is not the final verdict and Dimmesdale lives his life trying to fulfill this thought. Dimmesdale is taken along a treacherous path of emotional events and physical punishments which suck the life from his body and soul. Consequently, Dimmesdale cannot choose to live a life free from his sin and folds to become the prisoner of the sin which eventually leads to his death. Conclusively, throughout The Scarlet Letter, Dimmesdale is seen to be a man of evil, but after extensive research Hawthorne is shown to use Dimmesdale to teach a moral lesson through the effects of sin in order to show the crime is not just a physical experience, but also a mental journey, in which provides a chain of events that are moldable for future

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