Assignment In Thomas Paine's 'Common Sense'

1082 Words5 Pages
Common Sense Writing Assignment Common Sense was written by Thomas Pain in January of 1776, the same year that colonial America declared independence from Great Britain. Tension in America was at an all-time high, for Arguments given by some of the leaders at the time were for independence from Britain’s “intolerable acts” such as The Quartering Act, The Administration of Justice Act, The Boston Bill Port, the Quebec Act, and The Massachusetts Government Act. Thomas Paine created this infamous, yet famous, pamphlet to persuade the colonies to declare independence. It was written in layman terms so that everyone could easily understand it. Its references to the Bible also helped the colonists tie the concept of independence to the more well-known…show more content…
Paine’s arguments simply set aside the doubts Americans had, and gave them the motivation to actually pursue freedom. His views on government, monarchies, and independence correlated with the rest of the country, however, his views on religion differed significantly. If I were to be a colonist in America at the time, I would feel anger towards the British crown as well as the idea of monarchy. I would want to fight for my independence from an unjust mother country that imposed years of unfair taxes upon my household. I agree with many of Paine’s arguments such as the problems with a monarchical government and America’s potential to obtain independence. I feel as if Paine’s argument pertaining to the need for a just government to be the most compelling. The fact that humans are not perfect is the reason why we have to have order and a commonwealth. In conclusion, Common Sense was written by Thomas Paine to reason with the citizens of America, to persuade them to fight for independence from the British government. It began a popular yearning for independence that quickly swept the nation. If it had not been for this essential pamphlet, America’s independence might not have been obtained for many years to come.
Open Document