At The Rain Character Analysis

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Kate Chopin was a writer well beyond her time when she wrote the short stories At the Cadian Ball and The Storm. These stories center on a young twosome by the name of Alcée and Calitxa. In the story At the Cadian Ball a prequel to The Storm introduces us to start of a sexual attraction between Alcée and Calixta when they meet at a ball. Alcée is instantly attracted to Calixta and wants to pursue her despite his current courting to Clarisse. However their interaction is cut short when Clarisse sways Alcée away. The Storm picks up about five years since the interaction of Calixta and Alcée during a tumulus storm that has touched down in their town. Calixta now married to Bobinôt and has a child named Bibi who she cares for greatly. These two…show more content…
In The Storm Calixta’s emotions for Alcée comes back full force and she begins to feel the feelings she had for him all over again. The title gives an insight of what the story will be about. A storm is destructive; it damages and harms the environment around itself. This represents the affair that happens between Alcée and Calixta. Both of these individuals are now married, have children and five years has passed. Calixta allows Alcée shelter within her home as a storm passes by but this “nice” act leads to a selfish deed. Chopin writes “The contact of her warm palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into his arms, had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh” (The Storm). Infatuation is defined as intense admiration for someone. Alcée is displaying his sexual hunger for her as she kisses him back. Both of these individuals engage in a sexual one night stand with each other despite being married to others. I also believe that Alcée is selfish and an unbearable human being however we are focusing on Calixta. Calixta gives her body to Alcee in a way that she should only give to her husband…show more content…
Calixta ignores her morals and reminisces about her own satisfaction from before her marriage. Calixta from this moment should have ignored Alcee’s advances and remember her vows to her husband. Instead she embarks on emotions the two once held that night At The Cadian Ball. Kate Chopin use of language is exhibited when she writes “Oh! she remembered; for in Assumption he had kissed her and kissed and kissed her; until his senses would well nighfail, and to save her he would resort to a desperate flight. If she was not an immaculate dove in those days, she was still inviolate; a passionate creature whose very defenselessness had made her defense, against which his honor forbade him to prevail” (The Storm).
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