Atticus Finch Literary Analysis

871 Words4 Pages
Crespino, Joseph. "The Strange Career of Atticus Finch." Contemporary Literary Criticism, edited by Jeffrey W. Hunter, vol. 194, Gale, 2005. Literature Criticism Online, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/GRWQBP997595206/LCO?u=tamp73569&sid=LCO. Accessed 20 Mar. 2018. Originally published in Southern Cultures, vol. 6, no. 2, Summer 2000, pp. 9-29.
Finch represents a strong perspective that runs contrary to the ignorance and prejudice of the whites. Atticus Finch is convinced that he must instill values of equality in all his children, counteracting the racial influence the novels symbol, a mockingbird shows the theme of racial prejudice. Atticus Finch The unfair trial of Tom Robinson, in which the jury’s racial prejudice condemns an innocent
…show more content…
"Harper Lee and the Destabilization of Heterosexuality." Children's Literature Review, edited by Jelena Krstovic, vol. 169, Gale, 2012. Literature Resource Center, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/H1420106700/LitRC?u=tamp73569&sid=LitRC&xid=38f81394. Accessed 21 Mar. 2018. Originally published in Lovers and Beloveds: Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936-1961, Louisiana State University Press, 2005, pp. 117-153.
To Kill a Mockingbird centrally preoccupies itself with gender transitivity. These violations of normative gender manifest themselves in characters as diverse as Dill Harris, Scout Finch, Miss Maudie Atkinson, and even, to a lesser degree, Atticus Finch, as well as in several minor figures.
Shackleford, Dean. “The Female Voice in To Kill a Mockingbird; Narrative Strategies in Film and Novel.” Mississippi Quarterly 50, no. 1 (winter 1996-97): 101-13.
Shackelford compares To Kill a Mockingbird with its film adaptation in terms of representations of gender. Shackelford argues that, while the book’s female narrator infuses the novel with a feminist perspective, the film’s visual focus on the point of view of Scout’s father undermines this feminine
…show more content…
"“Growing Up Good in Maycomb”." Contemporary Literary Criticism, edited by Lawrence J. Trudeau, vol. 421, Gale, 2018. Literature Resource Center, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/H1100124081/LitRC?u=tamp73569&sid=LitRC&xid=eb74273b. Accessed 21 Mar. 2018.
Throughout the story, Atticus’s and Calpurnia’s failure to put Scout in dresses is evidence of their failure to train her to be a lady. These children in Maycomb learned virtues that formed in the memory and in the name that the memory gives to a place. They grew up good in Maycomb. Their childhood story, told in large part as a story about their father Atticus, is about growing up in virtue. A slightly quaint example of growing up good in Maycomb is Scout’s learning to be a Southern Lady,
Smykowski, Adam. "Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird." Contemporary Literary Criticism, edited by Jeffrey W. Hunter, vol. 194, Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/H1100060616/LitRC?u=tamp73569&sid=LitRC&xid=f7b4bad2. Accessed 20 Mar. 2018. Originally published in Readings on "To Kill a Mockingbird", edited by Terry O'Neill, Greenhaven Press, 2000, pp.
Open Document