Atticus Finch Moral Lessons

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“Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.” (Lee 101). Harper Lee, the author of To Kill a Mockingbird wrote an inspirational story that discusses racism at the time of the Great Depression. In To Kill a Mockingbird, there is a character named Atticus Finch, who is given a difficult task to be the lawyer of a black person, Tom Robinson, who was accused of raping a white women. Atticus Finch is known through Maycomb, Alabama as a man who is always respectful and true to others. He has two children, who he loves, and teaches them moral lessons that will get them through life. It is reasonably accurate that Atticus did try to make a stand to defend Tom Robinson. Given that Atticus is defending Tom Robinson, it shows that it is in Atticus’s nature to help others. Atticus is a man who helps others, and has…show more content…
He put his family and himself in danger. When Atticus received news that they were going to move Tom Robinson to another jail, he knew something wrong was going to occur to Tom Robinson. “I thought he would have a fine surprise, but his face killed my joy. A flash of plain fear was going out of his eyes, but returned when Dill and Jem wriggled into the light.” (Lee 203). This reveals that Atticus was afraid of the group of men that were going to hang Tom Robinson. After the halloween pageant, Scout and Jem were walking back home when they got attacked by Bob Ewell. “From somewhere near by came scuffling, kicking sounds, sounds of shoes and flesh scraping dirt and roots.” (Lee 351). This scene demonstrates that Bob Ewell attacks Jem and Scout, trying to get revenge. When taking this case Atticus wasn’t aware of the consequences it will bring to him and his family. Even though, he endangered himself, Jem, and Scout, Atticus taking the case had many positive effects on his children and Maycomb. He made them stronger and wiser, because of these
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