Atticus Parenting In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mocking Bird is a timeless, touching novel. The novel was set in the Great Depression in Maycomb, Alabama. Atticus Finch, a lawyer in the novel, is faced with an extremely difficult trial. Atticus was chosen to defend a black man, Tom Robinson that was accused of raping a white woman. Atticus not only had the trial to worry about; however he had two children, Jem and Scout, that he has to raise on his own. He teaches them to avoid being prejudice, a common thing in their small town, and to live their lives with integrity. Atticus’ unorthodox parenting skills are called into question by several characters in the novel. Two characters in the novel To Kill a Mocking Bird, that criticizes Atticus about his parenting is Uncle…show more content…
The way he handles his kids is his own business because it works for him. He teaches his kids the right things to do, how to treat people, and to look at everyone the same, and he expects them to do so. Jem and Scout are not perfect; however, they respect their father. On the other hand, Atticus is doing better than his sister, Aunt Alexandra. Francis was a racist, mean, little girl that only cares about her last name. Jem and Scout looks at everyone equal and see the world like they should. Atticus is raising his children like he should. Atticus' ways may be different than others, but if they do something wrong once, they will not do it again. Atticus is judged by a few in the community, but he is a great father. In To Kill a Mocking Bird, Atticus Finch is criticized by many people in the community about how he raises his children. Two characters in the novel that portray this action are Aunt Alexandra and Uncle Jack. Aunt Alexandra does not accept the way he raises Scout and how he lets her go around dressed like a boy. Uncle Jack just disagrees with Atticus' whole view on disciplining his kids. For Atticus to be raising his children on his own he is doing a wonderful
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