Augustine St. Clare In Uncle Tom's Cabin

582 Words3 Pages
“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” mostly took place throughout the American South during a time when slavery was still widely accepted and practiced. The story illustrates the harsh realities slaves had to endure on a daily basis and throughout the story the different moralities of the characters become apparent with their interactions with the slaves. Each of the character’s different moralities were brought upon by different figures in their lives who they are influenced by. Augustine St. Clare was raised by a kind, gentle woman whose qualities were instilled in him. Simon Legree grew up with a loving mother and a brutal father, but he picked up after his father’s terrible ways. Eva St. Clare was Augustine’s daughter and was a gentle child who treated the slaves with respect. She was influenced by her father’s kindness as well as her own…show more content…
Clare was Augustine and Marie St. Clare’s daughter. Her mother, Marie was a dreadful woman who lacked empathy and was particularly resentful towards the slaves. Augustine St. Clare was a decent man and he saw Eva as being the embodiment of his mother, who he had adored and respected so much. Eva exuded his mother’s positive qualities as a human being and maintained a certain childish innocence that blinded her from the atrocities of her surroundings. She was very kind to the slaves and had been keen on her dad purchasing Tom after he rescued her from drowning. She was an ill child and admitted to Tom that she would die to alleviate the sufferings of the slaves. “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was written in the mid nineteenth century and took place during a time when slavery was still widely practiced and accepted. Different moralities emerged during the time period that were either in support or opposition of slavery. These opposing views were reflected in the story and were influenced by various figures. These different moralities that the characters exhibited influenced the slaves’ lives directly both for the better and for the
Open Document