King Hammurabi: The King Of Babylon

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Hammurabi was the King of Babylon in the 18th-Century and ruled for more than forty years. The famous city of Babylon could be found in ancient Mesopotamia which was located between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers and presently known as Iraq. "If any one accuses another of murder but cannot prove it, then the accuser shall be put to death. If anyone steals anything from the temple or the court, he too will be put to death, and also the one who has received the stolen goods shall be put to death" these are just three examples of how King Hammurabi unjustly ruled the lands. By definition, to be "just" one must possess the ability to fix a problem or argument with another. His laws were discriminatory in that they were often seen as cruel punishments for the lower-class society. One of the reasons why he was so hash was his lack of desire to deal with such little problems as Rule 195, "If a son strikes his father, his hands shall be cut off." Many believed there were better ways to solve these problems than physical punishments. This may be seen as the simple way out of court trials and therefore made King Hummurabi 's life a little easier. It was perceived that the rich or upper-class were favored by the king. To prove that his decision making was viewed as heartless, we will further examine…show more content…
These little things bear less of a consequence than the judgement of life. No one should be careless enough to pass down the death sentence without hearing both sides of a case. Hammurabi had countless laws that ended in death, although this was a more common form of punishment it was still cruel and unjust. Laws 1, 3, 22, and 110 are other examples of crimes ending in death. A punishment of death should almost never be given unless you have taken someone 's life. In modern society we have found it is easier to imprison people and help them lay a track down to a better
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