Bad Intentions In Shakespeare's Julius Caesar

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There are many behaviors that deserve punishment. Harassing people, being physically or mentally abusive toward people, killing people, stealing from people, and many more are great examples. When someone has bad intentions, it’s going to be obvious, and they cannot and will not appear friendly or nice because people will be able to see right through them and their bad intentions. If someone lived in a bad government, I do not think they are to be blamed for serving that government, because they may have to choose between that, or death. In that case, they may have good intentions, because they were forced to do something, more than wanting to do that thing. I think that we are responsible for guiding people to make decisions that are immoral,…show more content…
In the first part of the book, when Katniss is spinning around showing her dress of to Caesar, he “Wraps a protective arm around me. ‘Don’t worry, I’ve got you. Can’t have you following in you mentor’s footsteps.’” (Collins 128). This quote means that he chooses to be caring and reassuring, even though he doesn't have to be. He didn't know Katniss before this interview, and will only most likely watch her die, like most of the tributes do. He doesn't have to acknowledge the tributes the way he does, especially not District 12, because that is the district that gets looked down upon. Caesar, however, tries to make her equal with the other tributes by treating her like she is important and making the audience like her. Again, if he had bad intentions, he is really going out of his way to be nice, because I think his friendliness is not a challenge, but comes natural to him. While he has good intentions, he also is a beneficial…show more content…
Throughout the book, Caesar says various things to different tributes while he is talking to them: “‘I’m very hard to catch...And if they can't catch me, they can't kill me. So don't count me out.’ ‘I wouldn't in a million years.’ says Caesar encouragingly.’” (Collins 126) This quote clearly shows his encouraging nature. I don’t know why someone would try to somehow make that seem negative. That was a nice thing that he said. If he wanted to be rude he would have been, and probably would have said something that made her confidence wither away. Why would someone pretend to be nice to people and have the same bad intentions for 40 years? Because that’s how long Caesar has been the host of this event. It sounds illogical to me, and a waste of time. I think he has been doing this for so long because he enjoys what he does: helping out the tributes and making them have more
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