Bad Science Argument Analysis

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When I had first opened Ben Goldacre’s book “Bad Science”, I did not know what was to be expected. Know that I have read and assessed the book I feel as though I have learned something that has given me the confidence to voice my opinion and have evidence to support my arguments on how some products claim to have scientific proof. That being said, fish oils, vitamins, detox, and brain gym are all bullshit creations that should not be sold to the public. Now, I say this only after having read Bad Science, because these techniques are criticized and challenged by Ben Goldacre. I have learned that some detoxification methods are bogus and can be disproven in my very own kitchen, and I don’t have to be an accredited university scientist to be able to prove this. Once more, I learned about the steps needed to ensure fair clinical trial (blinding and the randomization theory), and about the effects of placebo when compared to “sugar pills”. Last but not least – I have discovered the truth behind spinach, and the bullshit my parents have…show more content…
But with the help of Ben Goldacre and his book “Bad Science” I fee as though I am no able to spot bad science from a mile away. Drawing on such theories like the effect of placebo, sugar pills, and the dangers of miss informed ‘scientists’ claiming to have come up with new sciences behind certain foods (cough, cough. Dr. McKeith). In summary, the book has provided me with a breath of fresh air on controversial non scientific theories that have been built up through time and sold to us by ‘scientists who do not understand the aspects of basic biology. I would like to thank my professor for making us read this book and more importantly Ben Goldacre for shedding the light on Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma
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