Banquo Loyalty In Macbeth

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In William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Banquo is an honorable follower of the king; however, Macbeth is a greedy traitor with a bloodthirsty motive to be king. In the first two acts of the play, Banquo has proven himself to be devoted to the king, showing honesty and loyalty to his leader. First, Banquo states, “So I lose none / in seeking to augment it, but still keep / my bosom franchised and allegiance clear, / I shall be counseled” (2.1.36-39). Banquo tells Macbeth that he will support and follow Macbeth, but only if it does not cause him guilt. Banquo will not do anything that harms the nobility because his loyalty to the crown is stronger than his loyalty to Macbeth. Banquo is a close friend of Duncan and will not do anything to harm that relationship. Next, Banquo says to Duncan, “There, if I grow, / the…show more content…
Here lay Duncan, his silver skin laced with his golden blood, and his gashed stabs look'd like a breach in nature for ruin’s wasteful entrance; there the murderers, steeped in the colors of their trade, their daggers unmannerly breached with gore. (2.3.129-135) To avoid accusations, Macbeth frames Duncan’s guards for the murder. He lies by saying that he saw the guards kill Duncan and that he killed the guards because he was emotional after watching his king die. He manipulates others in order to clear his name. Therefore, Macbeth is a greedy traitor who lies and kills in order to rule the land. Macbeth and Banquo, two generals of the king, have different attitudes for the king; Banquo supports the king and impresses him, while Macbeth murders the king to take his position. The expedition of my violent love outrun the pauser reason. Here lay Duncan, his silver skin laced with his golden blood, and his gashed stabs look'd like a breach in nature for ruin’s wasteful entrance; there the murderers, steeped in the colors of their trade, their daggers unmannerly breached with gore.

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