Basic Human Fears In Edgar Allen Poe's Short Stories

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Have you ever read a book and just thought to yourself how similar that was to a situation you have been in? Well Edgar Allen Poe in his short stories he really makes you relate. Except he doesn’t make us relate to everyday common situations. He writes about the fears that are hidden in all of our subconsciousness, the ones that no one talks about but everyone thinks about.Poe effectively uses Basic Human Fears in his tales which is why his stories continue in popularity today. The reason that nobody can stop reading Poe books is because in away they’re the story of all of us... My first examples from the “Tell-Tale Heart” (1843) In this story Poe shows us many different examples of Basic Human Fears. The narrator is very afraid of being found out. He thinks he has everything under control, and has covered everything up however he gets more and more nervous of the Police figuring out what he did even though they had no idea he murdered the old man. He gets so afraid that he ends up giving himself away: “Villains! Dissemble no more! I admit the deed--!” The narrator is also afraid of the world knowing his crazy thoughts. The narrator thinks the old man’s eye can see inside of him, and the old man can read all of his crazy thoughts. There is also the all so common…show more content…
He tries to project himself as much better than Luchresi: “Luchresi cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry.” Montresor in the story is also afraid of his family losing the last of their power, and wealth. He comes from a history of a very powerful family that is losing political status. He is sort of taking this out on Fortunato. Fortunato at the end of the story gets very afraid of being buried alive. He gets a little bit hysterical and begs for his life. It is undeniable that Poe adds many Basic Human Fears in “The Cask of
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