Beauty And Beauty In Disney

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Animated films have been studied by researchers and scholars for years as these are one of the major sources of entertainment not only for children but for adults as well. It is believed that animated films are “good” for children as these types of movies stimulate imagination apart from providing amusement but, the truth is they do more than simply entertaining. In most cases, these films play the role of cultural authority to determine the definition of values and morals. Children learn more from what they watch which makes it very important for parents and educators to pay close attention at the content and features of these films. Children no longer learn only from books, they also prefer learning from varied forms of popular culture.…show more content…
Siklos (2009) claimed that Disney is world’s largest media conglomerate on the basis of market size. Lund and Tanner (2003) expressed their utmost fear in this regard as they proved that in Disney movies, beauty and/or appearance is more valued than intellect. Before talking about beauty, it is necessary to clarify the connection between body image and beauty. Body image usually expresses a person’s feelings of the aesthetics and attractiveness of his or her own body. The phrase body image was first coined by Austrian psychoanalyst Paul Schilder in his book The Image and Appearance of the Human Body (1935). It is true that human society has placed great importance on the beauty of human body, but a person’s perception of his or her own body may not always coincide with the…show more content…
It has certainly been a mistake for aestheticians to take this sense of beauty as the paradigmatic aesthetic concept – to act, that is, as if by giving an account of it one automatically has given an account for all aesthetic properties. Many, I would wager most, aesthetic terms are ‘‘impure’’ – they reflect, even require, beliefs and values: sincere, suspenseful, sentimental, shallow, sensitive, subtle, sexy, sensual, salacious, sordid, sobering, sustainable, skillful . . . and that, of course, only scratches the surface of the s-words! (Cooper, 1992:
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