Benedick And Beatrice In Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing

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One of my theories about Benedick and Beatrice, in their unique past relationship, is where Beatrice has no parents and the only lineage she has is her Uncle and Hero. This might explain how she fell outside of this norm, making it difficult for her to have a social standing among the other people in her society. Considering this during these times the father deals with most of the relationship choosing for the daughter and Beatrice doesn't have this. But since Shakespeare moves past a lot of these social norms and challenges them within his plays I think this missing part we don't know goes deeper emotionally. I think the two have fallen in love before both bearing scars from this. But I also believe this has something to do with the fact …show more content…

(1.1.25-26)" Signor Montanto is a reference she uses for Benedick himself. In the Oxford English Dictionary, it explains that Montanto means, "Montant" in English and its definition means, "and upward blow, thrust or direct cut upwards." So, the way Montant is said, I presume that Beatrice sees Benedick as a manly macho man that is proud and joyful of dealing blows to others. Whether it be on the battlefield of war or in his dealing with the matters of the heart and women. It is what she says within the next few lines that give us a connection between this also. "He set up his bills here in Messina, and challenged Cupid at the flight; and my uncle's fool, reading the challenge, subscribed for Cupid and challenged him at the bird-bolt (1.1.32-37)." I took these words as Benedick using bills to let everyone know he is ready to challenge Cupid in a contest of arrow versus arrow. Challenging Cupid to a fight shooting long distance arrows; I think Beatrice here wants us to believe that Benedick is using his ego here to claim he can shoot better than Cupid as Military macho man. He is more capable than Cupid himself to wound any women to fall in love with him, even Beatrice herself in this case. [3,4, and …show more content…

He hath every month a new sworn brother. (1.1 57-58)” The men in this society have their own misogynistic space, brothers in arms in this case. The men stick together, and if it comes down to it, loyalty among men is stronger than a womans. I think Beatrice here is suggesting in her eyes Benedick is a disloyal person because he has abandoned her in the past for the war and male companions. Beatrice here seems to be speaking of a self-involvement or someone who has experienced this before from Benedick. Maybe after pledging loyalty to her after he was disloyal in some way, had a change of heart, or cold feet decided to withdraw his contract. Seeking out male companionship to fill what he had run away from in Beatrice. Leaving Beatrice with a strong hatred of all men and love until (1.1.107-108), were Beatrice says to Benedick this phrase: "I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me." If a dog barks at you in any way, you will know where to stand, but if a man declares his love for you, he will let you down. Beatrice a little later goes into further detail of this while further arguing with Benedict during act one. "I would my horse had the speed of your tongue, and so good a continuer. But keep your way, o' God's name. I have done (1.1 115-117)." Beatrice retorting later 'You always end with a jade's trick. I know you of old' (1.1 118). Beatrice here is referring back to the earlier

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