Benedick And Beatrice In William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing

457 Words2 Pages
William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing is a comedic drama. This play provides a perfect blend of drama, as well as a fair amount of comedic relief, sometimes seemingly at the Inappropriate of times. In Act 4 Scene 1, lines 314-342, Benedick and Beatrice have already proclaimed their love for each other, after Claudio has called off his wedding with Hero. They are so blinded by the fact that one loves the other and vise-versa, they seem to allow all of their emotions to take ahold of them. The audience gets a dramatic view with a light comedic undertone; they are saying all these things about loving one another, because they think the other loves them. The extract shows the buildup in the climax in the relationship with Benedick and Beatrice, using dramatic irony, metaphor, and interruption. The audience sense the dramatic…show more content…
While Beatrice believed it was quite the contrary. In the extract while Benedick is trying to be calm and speak normally to Beatrice, she interrupts quite a few of his sentences. To men in that time, that was completely unthinkable and unnatural. Shakespeare could be considered one of the people to push for the feminist movement, making Beatrice a famous feminist. The interruption used showed how intense and emotional Beatrice was; She want to make sure that her thoughts were heard. Benedick seemed to be so “in love” with Beatrice that he was willing to prove his love to her no matter what. Beatrice shows that she is a strong independent woman, but hates all of the boundaries set on women. With the metaphor, “O, that I were a man for his sake!” saying in context if she was a man, she would fight, something not allowed for her sex. She gives a play in Benedicks words he says “By this hand, I love thee” playing on that she responds, “Use it for my love some other way than swearing by it” Telling him to prove his love by using his hands, suggesting him to attack
Open Document