Creativity In Benin Art

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The turning point that highlighted the change of feelings and thoughts about Benin art started to take place after the First World War. New interest of objects, including the sculptures of Benin, was come to light. The acceptance of the African art was inescapable. The Europeans who defined the Benin art as primitive were the first who supported it. To demonstrate, it was claimed that there is no artwork without cultural content; and the society in which such artworks are produced must not be neglected. Moreover, there is no substantial difference between European art and the art of other civilizations. There is no doubt that the definition that the Europeans gave to the art of Benin was changing whereas that art stood its ground.…show more content…
However, this definition of art is not completely objective because there are many objects that are regarded as personal expression but cannot be considered as art. There is an evidence to suggest that humans' minds are designed in a developed was to cover pattern in their circumference. This evidence is the fact that our predecessors were able to observe pattern such as tiger’s body pattern in a pattern of jungle’s danger. Therefore, sometimes humans observe patterns when there are no any patterns. Thus, we can assume that humans find personal creativity in objects, which were represented as personal expressive creativity by mistake. Hence, it can be assumed that objects, which are regarded as expressing personal feelings, can be seen in a different way by other people. Some random objects are seen as personal creativity when they are actually not. The expression that is depicted by the artist is not necessary the same expression that the viewer explicates. However, if these two parts happened to be the same, then the artist is seen as successful because he/she achieved his/her target. This differs from one observer to another depending on the different cultures and personalities. Thus, it is relative and each person regards it in his/her own way. Humans also regard some important pieces…show more content…
The punitive expedition was not only regarded as a great British achievement, but also as a justified penalty of "uncivilized savages" who "slaughtered" the British expedition a month ago. Thus, the British media didn't stop talking about Benin and its civilization. However, this huge interest in the kingdom of Benin lasted until the discussion had been regarded as repeated profusely. The bronzes arrived in Benin after a period of discussion about how primitive the people of Benin are. This caused a lot of confusion to the British scientists, ethnographers, and European press. When the bronzes were represented in Europe, their reputation changed from war spoils to scientific objects and then primitive art. The ethnographers and writers whose writings are prominent could depict the cultures as foreign such as the case of Bacon's letter where the culture of Benin is depicted as primitive. They can highlight the variations in a form that is full fierceness, to present the Benin people as primitive and barbarous. When the bronzes of Benin and their significance were estimated by the Europeans, the writers and ethnographers began to distinguish between these artworks and the art of Europe. Moreover, they domesticated the techniques of the casting and the characteristics to raise the bronzes to the artistic
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