Biographical Essay: Shinin In The South

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Shinin in the South I’s born in 1901 in Dyess, Arkansas where my daddy grew cotton and tabacca and other small crops we’d need to live on. Mamma just helped around the farm and did whatever was needed, I stayed around the house until i was old nuff’ to get out on the farm and help pick. My daddy did shine on the side to help us out with money but the prohibition started in 1919 when i was ten years old. This act made the distillation and sale of liquor illegal. I was mad about this but i figured if i make it and sell it at my own risk with no family involved i could help my ma and pa pay for some things we struggled with. I started making liquor with my daddy’s still when i was 18 years old my daddy originally taught me how to make and distill it. Soon enough my brothers Forst and Howard were helpin me run and we 'd haul 200 gallons on our ole…show more content…
I was was the youngest brother and I was the driver when we would haul it seemed like we stopped around every corner but we were the best in the valley and everone wanted a taste of what we had. We thought our little operation was good but we were just some rough ole country boys, we had heard the some gangsters in the city were havin liquor hauled in by the truck load and selling it at top price, but we didn 't wanna have no business with no gangsters. Soon enough me and my buddy cricket made a run in to the city and sold a load of 100 gallons of pure white lightnin and 105 gallons of crazy aple to a gangster named Mad Dog Floyd Banner, I sold the whole load for 5 dollars a gallon which was twice what Forst was gettin for it. When me and cricket got back to the house Forst was upset but I think he wasnt to mad about me selling the whole load in one haul for 5 dollars on the gallon. When I took my share from that money we made I went and bought myself a car I ended up buying a Ford v8 Roadster when we loaded up shine in it and put that souped up carb in it we could out run

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