Birth Of Love In Romeo And Juliet

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Love can be described as the feeling between two people that causes them to care about one another more than anything else. Its that warm, butterfly like feeling inside ones stomach, the thought that always races back and leads to a smile. There are millions of movies, books, stories, plays, pictures, and songs that revolve around the idea of love, what it feels like to be in love, the reasons to love and why love can hurt. A true display of how instense love can be takes place in the classic play Romeo and Juliet. In William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet he conveys that because love is overpowering it can take control over someone’s thoughts. The play perfectly discribes multiple forms of love such as the love between two people, a…show more content…
Juliet thinks,“My only love sprung for my only hate!/ Too early seem unknown too late/ Profigious birth of love it is to me/ that I must love a loathed enemy/” (1.5.136-143). As she says, “My only love sprung from my only hate” she explains that the only man she loves is the son of the only man she is forced to hate. She says that she saw him too early without knowing who he was and found out too late through, “Too early seen unknown, and known too late!”. Finally, when she says, “Prodigious birth of love it is to me” she is implying that she has a huge love for someone she is forced to hate. Through this Shakespeare is conveying that Juilet is so madly in love with Romeo even though his family, the Montegues, are Juilet’s family, the Capulets, greatest enemy. Juliet also explains to her nurse that her love for Romeo is so strong she does not mind that he killed her beloved cousin. Juliet explains, “Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?/ ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name/ when I thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?/ But wherefore, villian, didst thou kill my cousin? That villain cousin would have killed my husband”. (3.2.97-101) By “ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name/ when I thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?” Juliet is saying Ah, my poor husband, who will clear your name when I have been agreeing with my family and saying awful…show more content…
Lord Capulet is talking to Paris and asking him if he would consider marring his daughter. Lord Capulet says, “She is the hopeful lady of my earth./ But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart;/ my will to her consent is but a part/” (1.2.15-17). Lord Capulet is going out of his way to find his daughter, Juliet, the perfect husband. When he tells Paris, “But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart;/ my will to her consent is but a part/” he is telling Paris to go charm her and make her fall in love with him. It is clear that Lord Capulet explains that his permission is only part of her decision through the phrase,”my will to her consent is but a part/”. Lord Capulet wants his daughter to be happy and is working really hard at finding her a husband that deserves her. Later on in the play after Lord and Lady Capulet tell their daughter they have gone out of their way and set up a wedding for Paris and Juliet she informes them that she has decied not to marry Paris because she has already married Romeo. Lord Capulet yells “Doth she not give us thanks?/ Is she not proud? Doth she not count her blest,/ Unworthy as she is, that we have wrounght/”(3.4.143-145). He is explaing that Juliet is ungrateful and is not proud that he worked so hard to set her up with someone so amazing when he says, “Doth she not give us thanks?/ Is

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