Black Mixtape Analysis

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The Swedish documentary, Black Mixtape, traces race relations in the United States from 1967-1975. The captivating documentary includes appearances by popular African American figures like Civil Rights activist Stokely Carmichael, Black Panther Party founders Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton and Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. The purpose of the documentary is to show America in a different viewpoint than how it is portrayed internationally. Due to the Swedish dialect throughout the film, it is evident that there isn’t a specified audience. Black Americans have struggled to obtain equality and justice in this country for decades. The documentary captures pivotal events, for example, an interview with Angela Davis, an UCLA professor and…show more content…
A New York Times review states, “Black Mixtape tells a story of defiance and pride, it is also a tale of defeat, frustration and terrible destruction.” Whites viewed the Black Power Movement as a revolution; Blacks viewed the Black Power Movement as a fight for recognition as humans and as a race. Furthermore, the Black Power Movement was a political movement aimed to protect Black people from police brutality and encouraging black pride. It is interesting that the film also incorporates images from the Attica Revolution; New Yorkers don’t speak of the horrific events that occurred that day. One of the hostages from the prison was also confused as to why the state of NY decided it would be better to attack weaponless prisoners. These prisoners’ requests were not outrageous, they only wanted healthcare, educational opportunities, fair visitation rights and improved food. I pose a question: was it because they were prisoners and excluded from the human population or because most of them were colored? The requests were basic negotiations of fundamental human rights. Moreover, I recommend everyone of the human race, domestically and internationally, to watch this uncovered footage of black America during the Black Power
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