Black Resistance In The Civil Rights Movement

1704 Words7 Pages
The topic of Social Justice will be examined as well as black consciousness, religion and police brutality. In this paper, we will look at these specific topics in level of importance as well as examine the lyrics from Strange fruit and Mississippi goddamn by Nina Simone as well as Alright and the Blacker the Berry from Kendrick Lamar. These two artists have truly embodied the meaning of black resistance from the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Lives Matter Movement. Also, their music has great symbolism and helped move the culture forward in the fight to end Social Injustice. The definition of black resistance is going against the establishment that is been provided for us and creating new rules. Also, understanding the concept of empowering…show more content…
Black churches became the place of organizing and the birthplace for the civil rights movement. One of the largest contributors to the civil rights movement is the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Founded in 1957, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was the leading civil rights orgaztion that helped organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Using the church as a haven to bring African Americans together to strategize how they can make the boycott effective and bring awareness to the inequalities that have been attached to African American. Leading these conversations was a young minister from Atlanta Georgia, who is now known to be the father of the civil rights movement, Martin Luther King Jr. Using his theological background, King used the church as a gathering place to discuss the Racial tension and as well as create strategy to fight for equal rights for the African American…show more content…
Which leads her to be asked to perform the famous song at the march in Selma. Nina Simone released the song during the height of the civil rights movement. When analyzing the Mississippi Goddamn lyrics, Simone quoted I don’t belong, I don’t belong, I’ve even stopped believing in prayer. Arguing that regardless of how serve the racial tension has gotten, African American still believed that it would get better. Also, there is a sense of thinking that faith will play a part in solving issues. Per Claudia Roth Pierpont’s article in the New Yorker entitled “A Raised Voice”, Pierpont argues that Simone had a small feeling for the Biblically curved elevate that characterized the songs of praise of the time. Not only being known for her activism, Nina Simone left her mark on Civil Rights Movement with her songs and willingness to bring awareness to Social Injustice through her Musical
Open Document