Blame The Eater And What You Eat Is Your Business

1540 Words7 Pages
Unhealthy Food Indulgence: Who Is To Blame? Obesity and its associated health problems continue to be a growing menace to the American population. With only a few minutes spent on a busy street observing all the people of diverse ethnicities, age and race walk by and most of us will agree that obesity in America is not exclusive; it’s affecting both the young and old alike. David Zinczenko and Radley Balko both agree that some measures should be carried out in the fight against obesity in their articles, “Don’t Blame the Eater” and “What You Eat Is Your Business” respectively. However, differences exist between the views of the two authors as to who to blame for the obesity crisis. Zinczenko believes that the fast-food industry…show more content…
He recommends strict government enforcement of nutritional information on products by fast-food industries which will educate the public on the dangers of fast-food products and thereby help consumers make better food choices. Balko, on the other hand, contends that strict government regulation of fast-food industries will not be a lasting solution to the obesity epidemic. He calls for individuals to be more responsible for their actions and be rewarded or penalized based on the lifestyle choices they make. Balko maintains that lifestyle rewards and penalties will condition Americans to take charge of their health. As I carefully examined the reasoning behind Zinczenko and Balko’s views in their articles, I experienced mixed feelings. I acknowledge that fast food industries should be regulated by the government, but ultimately, Americans should be…show more content…
Six months after I gave birth to my third child in September 2009, I realized that I was tipping the scale at almost 200 pounds and can only fit into a size 16 pants and not my regular size 6 pants. My back hurt on a daily basis. I complained of the mattress on our bed and blamed it for my constant back pain. I was in denial that the problem could be the excess 55 pounds of fat that were hanging on my 5 foot 7 inches frame. My husband bought several mattresses during that period, but none of them gave me comfort for a good night’s sleep. I finally had enough and made a decision to lose weight. I sought for help, completely revamped my diet and started an intense exercise regimen. By December 2010, I had lost 54 pounds, was back to my size six jeans and free of back pain. Individuals that are blaming the fast food industry for their obesity-related illnesses, are relative to me blaming the many mattresses I slept on for my back pain. I was living in denial until I came to a point in my life that I had to take charge of my health. As a result, this experience has shaped my view on the issue of obesity. It has enlightened me on the role personal responsibility plays in the fight against obesity. My point is not that children who face similar situations like Zinczenko did while growing up are to blame for situations they found themselves in. According to Zinczenko, “My parents were
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