Bleeding Kansas Argumentative Analysis

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All men are by the nature equally free and independent, and have a certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and the liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and seeking and obtaining happiness and safety; and the right of all men to the control of their persons exists prior to the law, and is the inalienable. Like Foster and Tappan, delegates Charles and Sarah Robinson came from the strong abolitionist families and left comfortable livelihoods to ensure that the state of Kansas entered the Union as a free state. Leavenworth prospered from the railroad money in the form of the employees who constructed the tracks through the Cascade Mountains. In the early 1960’s the people of Leavenworth realized that they needed to make the incredible effort to change their situation and they decided to change the appearance of the town to bring in tourists.…show more content…
In the same month that Kansas voters ratified the Leavenworth Constitution, the U.S. Congress also rejected it. Its supporters were not surprised by the outcome, if Kansans would have to take another stab at a state constitution. Still, the delegates behind the Leavenworth Constitution showed considerable foresight. The mayhem of the “Bleeding Kansas” era was more than a violent struggle over the expansion of the institution of slavery, as the animosity of the period boiled over the political and legal debates. This was especially apparent when the territory prepared for the statehood as the tasks of creating, approving, and receiving the federal recognition of Kansas’s founding the document were proving an impossible
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