Blood Stressure: Causes And Effects Of Blood Pressure

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Blood Pressure

Blood Pressure is the pressure of circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. Blood Pressure usually refers to the arterial pressure in the systemic circulation. Blood Pressure is expressed in terms of the systolic pressure over diastolic pressure and is measured in millimeters of mercury. Blood Pressure can be influenced by things that we can’t do anything about like race, age, and gender. Normal Blood Pressure is less than 120 over 80 (120/80), Prehyprotension blood pressure is 120-139 or 80 or 89, Stage 1 high blood pressure is 160 and above and over 100 and above. High blood pressure in people age 60 is 150 and above over 90 and above. There are people out in the world that are most likely have High Blood
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When the lower blood pressure number is less than 90, treatment is generally considered only when systolic blood pressure tops 160. Among older patients, the evidence isn't yet clear that the pros outweigh the cons of treating it in the 140-160 range.
Low blood pressure means that your blood pressure is lower than normal. ... But if your blood pressure drops suddenly or causes symptoms like dizziness or fainting, it is too low. It can cause shock. Shock can be dangerous if it is not treated right away. Eating a diet that is rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and skimps on saturated fat and cholesterol can lower your blood pressure by up to 14 mm Hg. Some of the major types of commonly prescribed cardiovascular medications are summarized in this section. For your information and reference, we have included generic names as well as major trade names to help you identify what you may be taking; however, the AHA is not recommending or endorsing any specific products. If your prescription medication isn't on this list, remember that your healthcare provider and pharmacist are your best sources of information. It's important to discuss all of the drugs you take with your doctor and understand their desired effects and possible side effects. Never stop taking a medication and never change your dose or frequency without first consulting your
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Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. If your doctor recommends it, you could prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar)*, spironolactone (Aldactone)* or triamterene (Dyrenium)* are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don't cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone, but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide*, Dyazide*, Maxzide* or

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