Essay On Boeing Ethics

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Boeing Corruption case Three learning points Boeing ethics: Boeing has made much publicly about its supposed ethics reforms "post Boeing CFO Sears and Druyun." But the average Boeing employee still does not know whether to laugh or cry when thinking of the state of Boeing's ethics. That is what I observed at Boeing before my termination for trying to terminate what is perhaps the most serious of the illegalities Boeing still is willingly performing, openly or not. Although "Boeing Ethics" would not act despite multiple witnesses in each case, I did learn some important facts myself This "Code of Conduct" further insulated Boeing management from their and their department's actions, like the "Boeing Ethics" department does as noted above. If …show more content…

A former Boeing CEO used to say, similarly, that Boeing built "quality airplanes." Both are technically correct uses of the terms "ethics" and "quality," however those uses are misleading as would be expected at a company still so unreformed and ethically challenged. There are good ethics and bad ethics. So, also, there is good quality and bad quality. So, if you are a Boeing executive, putting the word "ethics" in the title of your ethically challenged "ethics" department is technically correct even if massively misleading--such a moniker rightly names a department within Boeing that handles ethics complaints as noted above, overlooking bad ethical activity at Boeing if it's sufficiently in the corporate interest to do so, rather than ensuring good ethics practices at Boeing as the naive reader of the title would assume. The Boeing ethics department name states nothing about what kind of ethics that department protects--good or bad. Only its actions do. Similarly, stating Boeing builds "quality airplanes" states nothing about the quality of Boeing airplanes. Boeing could have the worst quality airplanes on the face of the planet and that description of Boeing airplanes as being "quality airplanes" would be …show more content…

• The first is to be profitable, which provides a basis for Boeing's success. • Campbell (2007) defines eight propositions under which companies fail to meet or successfully exceed the minimum behavioral standard for corporate social responsibility. These propositions relate well to Carroll’s four factors in that the first two propositions identify that operating profitably and in a healthy economy increases the likelihood that a company will engage in socially responsible activities (Campbell, 2007). • Boeing is the world's largest aerospace company and the leading manufacturer of commercial jetliners and defense, space, and security systems (Boeing: About us, 2013). • As a top U.S. exporter, the company supports airlines and allied government customers in 150 countries and employs more than 170,000 people across the United States and in 70 countries (Boeing: About us, 2013). • Boeing's services and products include satellites, advanced information and communication systems, electronic and defense systems, launch systems, weapons, commercial and military aircrafts, and performance-based logistics and training (Boeing: About us,

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