Boston Tea Party Analysis

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On July 4th, 1776, British colonists passed the declaration of independence in their continental congress, 5 years later, on October 17th, 1781, the British government surrendered and the colonists had officially won their freedom from the tyranny of England. This independence was a result of the distressing relationship between the colonists’ and the British government. The events leading up to the declaration tell us just how bad the relationship between the two groups was. Britain enforced many unnecessary acts and proclamations that angered the colonists’. This anger led to the Boston massacre, Boston tea party and then ultimately the fight for independence. One of the first missteps the British government made was In 1763, King George…show more content…
Angered colonists decided this was not fair and on the 16th of December 1773, dressed up as the Mohawk Indians, raided the ships and dumped all of the tea into the Boston Harbour. In the picture on the tea party from power point three, we see the colonists dressed as Mohawk Indians throwing crates of what we assume is tea and the British militia running towards the ship trying to stop the colonists. This event angered the British government and as a result, they introduced the “intolerable acts” of 1774. These acts consisted of the Boston port act (the closing of the Boston port); Massachusetts government act (colonists had less power and royal officials were put in charge); administration of justice act (allowed royal officers to be tried in other colonies when they committed crimes in Boston); and the quartering act (colonists had to take in British militia and feed them) was expanded to all colonies not just…show more content…
The Colonists did not start off wanting independence but as the years went on their relationship with the British government worsened because of all the Proclamations and Acts introduced in the colonies. This resulted in a very disappointing outcome for the British government and an amazing journey for the new Americans who now had a country to
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