Bowen's Family Systems Theory

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The main goal of Bowen’s family systems theory is to study human behavior in relation to their family interactions. It is a scientific way of studying the eight concepts that comprises the theory. Bowen’s research is based on elaborate study of the development of schizophrenia where the mother and child relationship are crucial (Hall, 2016). Bowen views the family as an interconnected unit consisting of complex relationships and it influences an individual’s behavior and thinking process. Months of intense research with schizophrenic patients and family members, made him realize that the interaction between family members was more strong and influential than what he imagined. This emotional bonding not only existed primarily between…show more content…
In case of a death in the family, mostly the father then the eldest son just silently slips into his shoes. So was it in the case of my uncle who had to bear a lot of responsibilities at a tender age. In the process he became very emotionally attached to the family, handling every member problems as if his own. With the death of my grandfather, rest of the family members looked upon him and he diligently carried on his duties. Problems arise when he was around 25 years of age. His friend who was living in the nearby city managed to get a job for him in a garment factory. The family initially was reluctant to let him go for obvious reasons. Indian culture places too much importance on the role of the elder son and focuses on family togetherness, refusing to allow its members to disintegrate. Togetherness is a means to exert control on one another while disintegration is viewed to free oneself from this control which is taken in a negative manner. According to sources, my uncle himself had a hard time detaching himself from the family. However, on persuasion he did move to the city but often found himself excessively worrying about his family. He would refrain going out with his friends preferring to stay indoors, nor participate in any company gatherings or events. In addition, he used to take extended leaves from his job, and soon he was dismissed. Jobless his anxiety levels increased and soon he would find himself missing home…show more content…
Her birth was considered as a blessing for the family. It is common circulated story within about how her birth had changed the destiny of their family. She not only brought good luck but also prosperity and fame soon followed. Hence, she was the most adored child in the family. Initially, this was not a problem but as times passed by this love and adulation soon became suffocating. She was escorted everywhere she went, was not allowed to stay out late, was not allowed to socialize the way she wanted. She had to ask her dad’s permission for everything. She was emotionally confused because though she wanted freedom and the right to do what she wanted but she also did not want to break her dad’s heart by disobeying him. Things took a wrong turn when she met Nazim, my to be brother in law. He was an Islamic by religion and her a Brahmin of the highest order. In our culture this is a next to impossible union, because of its societal pressure and expectations. Although Nazim was a well-educated and came from one of the affluent families, still religion posed a major problem. In fact, both the families were old friends, especially the dads were old buddies. But when they came to know about their kid’s affair, friendship took a back seat. Both the families stopped talking or attending each other’s festivities. The opposition was more from our side because of stringent societal pressure and the over powering caste system. One of the negative
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