Brown V. Board Of Education Court Case

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Brown V. Board of Education was a court case that challenged the idea of “Separate but equal”, the cause of this court case was that there was segregation going on in certain areas such as stores, parks, and even schools. One of the major causes of this court case was the Plessy V. Ferguson court case. The idea of the Brown V. Board of Education court case was to challenge the “Separate but equal” policy. The separate but equal policy was the idea that blacks and whites are separated but are still equal. The Brown V. Board of Education court case questioned this decision. Is segregation appropriate in schools? In public schools, there was a lot of segregation due to racism and prejudices. Many minorities were rejected into public schools.…show more content…
Board of Education court case, Thurgood Marshall represented Linda Brown and her father, Oliver Brown. Born on July 2,1908, in Baltimore, Maryland.Thurgood Marshall studied law at Howard University. During the court case of Brown Vs. Board of Education, there were many protests such as, boycotts, and sit-ins. For example, African Americans in Richmond, a southern city, boycotted the most recent segregated streetcar systems in 1904. Another example of protesting during the Brown V. Board of Education court case was Samuel Tucker who led an attempt to integrate the Alexandria library through civil disobedience. People who agreed with segregation on the other hand protested Jim Crow Laws in the city’s educational system. Since this court case was rather a big deal in the US society, Newspapers and articles started flooding the media with catching outlines like, “Court Bans Segregation in Public Schools.” and “High Court Rules Against Segregation in Schools.” During protests, people held up signs saying things like, “I have lost four years of Education, why five?” This supreme court caused many conflict and protests, boycotts, etc. Eventually, when this court case was closed and won, many things changed. For example whites and blacks could not be segregated in public schools because it was ruled unconstitutional. It is not illegal to segregate anyone of any race. There is a huge diversity of races in every school. It made people open their eyes and understand…show more content…
It took a lot of getting used to. It benefitted the US as well because it forced us to get to know each other more and helped end some prejudices a little bit. If segregation was still going on today, there would be so much more protesting, riots, etc. There would as many prejudices as there was back then. We wouldn’t learn to work together very well. At first it was difficult for African Americans to go to public schools with white kids because they had to adapt to a new environment and for the first time, they had to work with white kids and that of course, was not very easy for them because they were probably bullied at first. After so many years, the court overruled Plessy v. Ferguson and agreed that the segregation in schools was a violation of the 14th amendment. Although this court case did help in a lot of cases, some states did not take this in very well. There are some US schools today that still remain segregated. For example, in New York City, more than half the public schools are at least 90 percent black or hispanic. In Alabama,about a quarter of African Americans with white enrollment with 1 percent or less. After the court case was approved and segregation was not as common, African Americans saw it as an new era for
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