Brown V Board Of Education Dbq Essay

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The civil rights movement was a time of challenges and achievements with the goal of equality for African Americans, Women, and Native Americans . African Americans were not recognized in the United States as equal but as separate. The Brown v Board of Education court case occurred on May 17, 1954. The ruling was that separate but equal schools were deemed unconstitutional. In three years Central High School would begin integration starting with nine African Americans. Many letters were written to Dwight D. Eisenhower regarding the integration. For example, Fredrick B. Austin, wrote in a letter saying, “Mr, President I BEG of you for the sake of the white children to request the removal of the colored students & the troupes from Little Rock, …show more content…

Mary Anderson wrote in her letter, “Congratulations on your courageous action in the Little Rock affair (McGwin, Docs) ”. Integration problems were not just in education but in daily life. The Montgomery bus boycott began on December 5, 1955 on the day of Rosa Park’s hearing. This is said to be the first large-scale demonstration against segregation in the United States. The boycott was going to continue until Alabama met the demands, so “On the afternoon of December 5, black leaders met to form the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) (Montgomery Bus, history.com)”. This boycott had thousands go African Americans refusing to get up when told to move for a white person. The boycott ended on December 21, 1956 after Montgomery buses were to be integrated. The symbol of change for African American moods was the sit-in movement. February 1, 1960, four freshman students were declined lunch and asked to leave. This protest started the sit-ins movement with hundreds of people. It was a brutal protest because, “The students sat in. Went to jail, came out, sat in again. Marched. …show more content…

They used the tactics of black self-reliance and violence as a means of self defense. Young people played a large part in the freedom riders. In May of 1961, thirteen people known as freedom riders left on a greyhound bus. The goal was for these thirteen people to reach New Orleans, Louisiana to commemorate Brown v Board of Education anniversary. However large amounts violence occurred when the freedom writers entered white only areas. Huge sums of whites would surround the greyhound bus and brutally beat the freedom riders as they got off. Throughout time, “The rides continued […] under pressure from the Kennedy administration, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued regulations prohibiting segregation in interstate transit terminals (Freedom Rides, history.com)”. Discrimination was still continuing and the demand for equality was rising higher. The March on Washington brought many civil rights organizations together on August 28, 1963. More than a quarter million people showed up, and marched from the Washington monument to the Lincoln memorial in protest and celebration. This was a widespread televised event. Ending at the Lincoln memorial would be an entire program. Statements were made by the organizations one of them saying, “As such, the Washington March is a living petition […] of both races who will be present from all parts of our country

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