Brutus Evil In Julius Caesar

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Brutus’s tragic flaw is that he is far too noble and trusting. In the play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus is commonly known as the most honorable Roman, but he is often seen as foolish as he never questions the immoral act of killing someone just because a friend suggest it. He is so exceptionally noble that he wouldn’t think twice about killing all of the commonwealth if he knew it would be for the good of Rome. Being approached by friends and “random citizens” alike of what to do about Caesar’s upcoming power, Brutus immediately feels the need to act. So forth, his nobility and trusting nature lead to mistaken action without question. Although nobility and trust are usually positive qualities to have, they can become tragic if one has them at an exceptional rate. Cassius and the other conspirators deceive Brutus, because they need someone so well-loved by the people that any fault he made would be over looked.…show more content…
The play, for all intents and purposes should be called “The Tragedy of Marcus Brutus”, as it follows Brutus being mislead and played as a fool for the audience to watch and only in the end, dying. Caesar being as he was, a paranoid man believed to be a god, dying in an excessively cliché way, making it not nearly as tragic as Brutus’s death. As Brutus is the leading face of the people, the man that was beloved by all, he is seen in a bright light regardless of how morally incorrect his actions are. If his nobility and trusting nature weren’t so critical to his personality then it’s likely the events of Caesar’s death would have never occurred, but its because of these so called flaws that he is so well loved. This goes to show he will not be blamed or refuted for any wrongdoings as he is far too noble, but he is also lead astray easily to do these said wrongs for he is too

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