Buddhist Funeral Analysis

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Peace and serenity are important in a Buddhist funeral. As the Buddhists have a diverse tradition, there is no single funeral or ritual service that all Buddhists use (Jamtech solutions, 2015, the Buddhist society). At a traditional Buddhist funeral, the family will wear white or cover their clothing with a traditional white cloth, along with a headband or armband. They can also, Walk with sticks to show that grief has left them the need for support, Chant or sing appropriate prayers, Bring offerings such as flowers and fruit, Burn incense to “sweeten” the air, Ring gongs or bells. Although Buddhists believe in reincarnation it is still acceptable for them to grieve. The deceased would be cremated or buried. In most traditional funerals they…show more content…
There will also be no cameras or and tape recorders (Funeral source, 2014, Buddhist funeral traditions). In Tibet they have sky burials. A Sky burial is to feed vultures with the body of the dead. It is the most common way to dispose of the corpses of commoners, and is not considered suitable for children who are less than 18 years old, pregnant women, or those who have died of infectious disease or accident (Ministry of Culture, 2003, sky burial in Tibet). However others argue saying that in Tibet there is no trees and grass therefore making it difficult to cremate the body, they also refuse to bury the body as they are scared of diseases spreading (YouTube, 2011, Tibetan sky burials)so they perform a sky burial. A man called rogyapa, or "breaker of bodies “will sets aside his blade that he used to decapitate the body and grabs a hammer to destroy the remaining bones for the vultures to eat. This is known as a sky burial or heavenly burial. To foreign eyes, this funeral ceremony may seem mean and rough or scary and depressing. Yet within the religious and geographic contexts of Tibetan culture, it is the perfect fate for the body humans leave behind in…show more content…
At dawn on the “lucky” day, the dead body is sent to the burial site among mountains which is always far from their homes. Then "Su" smoke is burned to attract condors, Lamas chant sutras to redeem the sins of the soul, and a professional heavenly burial master deals with the body. If the vultures eat the body it means that the body has no sin and that the soul of the deceased has gone peacefully to the paradise of the Tibetans on the mountains around the heavenly burial. Any remains left by the vultures must be collected up and burnt while the Lamas chant sutras to redeem the sins of the dead, because the remains would tie the spirits to this life. Besides, there are a lot of things that are forbidden in the process of the burial. Strangers are not allowed to attend the funeral as the Tibetans believe it will bring negative efforts to the rising of the souls. So visitors should respect this custom and keep away from such occasions. The family members are also not allowed to be present at the burial site (Chloe xin, 2014, Tibetan Funeral Customs, Sky Burial in
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