Bureaucratic Management Theory

960 Words4 Pages
In the beginning, it is essential to clearly define those bureaucratic management, behaviour management, and Japanese management technique. Bureaucratic management is a theory set forth by Max Weber, a German sociologist and political economist whose theory contained two essential elements, including structuring an organization into a hierarchy and having clearly defined rules to help govern an organization and its members. Bureaucratic management can be thought of as a formal system within an organization that is distinctly based on precisely defined hierarchical roles and levels to help maintain efficiency and effectiveness. Japanese management techniques include:  in-house training of managers  consensual and decentralized decision-making…show more content…
Confucian-based management is behaviour management technique referred to here. In China’s SOE sector, bureaucratic management behaviour is partly a function of the size and legacy of government administration and some influences from Chinese culture reinforce this. For instance, the large power distance between managers and subordinates and the vertical links within hierarchies mean that identities and loyalties are primarily vertical in nature and reflect respect for the idea of loyalty to the ruler. Confucian philosophy still retains influence over managerial values whilst some younger managers in the urban coastal locations are becoming attracted to western individualism. It is this contradiction between individualism and collectivism that embodies one of the key paradoxes facing China in its attempts to pursue…show more content…
In the workplace, it is suggested that a narrowing gap between the myth and reality of modern management methods is allowing such paradoxes to be managed. In other words, the Confucian values of authority, hierarchy and respect are providing an ideological framework that can encompass modern management methods. Worker perspectives on these changes constitute the prime focus of this topic. In respect of the literature’s interest in the questions of harmony in the employment relationship and respect for authority. It was noted that workers’ dissatisfaction with pay, work conditions and workplace influence was strongly related to their disaffection with a union form that was widely perceived as weak and marginal. There was no evidence (or history) of collective forms of worker opposition to these conditions, a situation that may be partly attributable to residual cultures of trust in those SOEs that have yet to be subject to privatization pressures but equally, the lack of independent union organization. In conclusion, academic interest in the global diffusion of western management techniques has taken a singular turn with increasing weight being placed on the potential influence of Confucian principles in generating a hybrid
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