Dimensions Of Burnout Analysis

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2.2.1. Dimensions of Burnout According to Maslach, burnout can be a collection of several dimensions such as emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment (Maslach et al. 2001): 1. Emotional exhaustion is defined as the feeling that someone has or suffer from excessive burden and feels suffering because of his/her job. This aspect is the most important aspect in burnout and the most frequently reported. In addition to emotional aspect, this burnout dimensions can also mean physical and mental exhaustion. It is characterized by a feeling of lack of energy, fatigue or weariness, frustration, desperation, helpless, stress and feeling of trapped, cranky, and irritable for no apparent reason. 2. Depersonalization…show more content…
According to Frain and Valigna (1979) as written by Gillies (1994), human reactions to stress can be divided into four categories. Category I is the mildest category that involves automatic responses to daily or routine stressor and the reaction is unrecognized and non-threatening, category II is the response to mild stressors that are perceived as threatening to individuals, category III is the moderate response to persistent stressors which are not resolved by adaptive reactions and decrease individual’s functional ability, and category IV is reaction in which individuals suffer from physical and emotional exhaustion, or burnout. According to Alexander (2009), burnout in nurses has several stages as follows: 1. Stage 1: Disappointment and fatigue. At this stage, nurses will feel an emotional distance from patients and be more concerned with personal priorities. 2. Stage 2: Frustration and indifference. At this stage, nurses will feel cynical and their personal relationships begin to be strained. 3. Stage 3: Sense of powerlessness and professional failure. At this stage, nurses begin to have decreased caring and competency, be alienated from colleagues and patients, and have emotional coping…show more content…
Etiology of Burnout Burnout is the end result of work stress. The American Psychological Association (2015) states that about 75% of Americans suffer at least one symptom of stress every month. Stress is defined as an imbalance state in energetical supply which makes someone feeling difficulty to restore or compensate (Sanders 1983). Stress can be beneficial if it is considered as positive motivation or inspiration and does not pose a threat to someone experiencing it; however, stress can also mean bad stress and bring anger, tension, or confusion. According to Maslach et al (2001), the contributing factors of burnout may consist of situational factors and individual factors. The situational factors include job characteristics (such as workload, role conflict, or role ambiguity), occupational characteristics (such as emotional stress from work), and organizational characteristics (such as organizational processes or structures that may shape employees’ emotional and cognitive relationship with their works). Individual factors also play an important role in the occurrence of burnout, such as demographic characteristics (such as age, sex, or marital status), personality characteristics, and job attitudes (Maslach et al, 2001). Alexander (2009) summarizes various burnout’s risk factors into three
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