Burwell Vs. Hobby Lobby Case Analysis

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Separation of Church and state should remain a priority in order to prevent prejudice of religion. In the 2014 Supreme Court ruling, Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby, Hobby Lobby was under attack for not including contraceptives in their health care. By not providing them to employees, Hobby Lobby was violating the contraceptives mandate under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) (hobbylobbycase.com). The Christian-based business fought back, arguing that it was within their religious freedom to choose not to offer something they were against. The first amendment was not implemented only to protect the rights of each religious community, but also the rights of non-religious communities. If the issue was within a state-run establishment, it would be against…show more content…
In the case of Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby, nobody’s rights were being denied because the employees chose to work at a private, Christian organization. Each employee still had the right to find employment elsewhere. The first amendment was not put in place only to protect people from a government implemented church, but also to protect the freedom of religion for each individual. There are multiple causes for a separation between the nation’s religions and its government. In order to obtain “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” an individual has to be allowed to pursue them alongside their religion (Declaration of Independence 1776). The pursuit of happiness can be explained as the ability to pursue a successful and stable life. It is the inalienable right of the American citizen to be able to make his or her way to the top. This right, along with that of religion freedom, should not only be protected, but also coincide. The wall of separation was implemented in order to protect America. It was necessary to protect each religious community from each other, but also to protect citizens from a mandated religion. The idea was to allow religious freedom as long as it does not violate the rights of others (fee.org). These must not be ignored, but instead be more reason to separate church from
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