Cake Film Analysis

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Cake, directed by Daniel Barnz was released in the United States in 2014, the film portrays Claire, played by Jennifer Aniston. In this film she is a white, upper middle class woman who is plagued by being single, having a prescription drug problem, mental ailments, and a hostile, and bitter attitude. Claire is suffering from depression, and PTSD after a tragic accident where she was seriously injured and her son was killed. The film repeatedly depicts Claire as a lunatic, and only focusses on the superficial aspects of her issues, concealing the darker, deeper aspects of her conditions. The film highlights sexist views as only women are victims, whereas the men, whether widowed or suffering the loss of a child are fine and are able to lead…show more content…
It is particularly used to discrimination against girls and women.” (J. Doyle and M. Paludi) Sexism can be seen on many different levels, such as individual, social/structural, institutional, and cultural levels. In Cake most all of the levels of sexism are present (J. Doyle and M. Paludi). Sexism is seen during Claire’s visit with her doctor, her relationship with men, peers, and also herself. The film depicts women as frail damsels in distress that need men to save them. The men however, even though they have experienced tragedy, are still strong wholesome men who seem unfazed and mentally stable. During the beginning of the film a scene is exchanged between Claire and her gardener where she steps outside on to the patio and gives him a seductive, luring look; within seconds the films cuts to a sex scene where the gardener is taking complete advantage of Claire who is lying there, unengaged and remote. Additionally, at the end of the film Claire only attempts to get better due to the hope of love with Roy (Sam Worthington). These two incidences alone paint a stereotypical image of…show more content…
While it is obvious that men are not immune to pain or free from experiencing trauma, a National Institution Drug Abuse (NIDA) report on prescription-drug abuse and addiction stated that studies indicate that: “women were more likely than men to be prescribed an abuse-prone prescription drug, particularly anti-anxiety drugs—in some cases 48 percent more likely (Bardhi, Flutura). Again, as aforementioned genderization of men and women greatly impacts who seeks help for their mental ailments. Once an individual begins taking a prescription medication for PTSD and or associated disorders it is difficult for them to stop taking the medication; additionally it is extremely difficult for a physician to determine when an individual no longer needs said medications; judging ones level of physical and mental pain is near impossible. However, government and medical/pharmaceutical professionals are clear that a three stage process is necessary for "medical use” of prescription drugs to occur: a) A physician diagnoses and provides a written prescription for specific pills and dosage unit(s), b) The patient/consumer purchases such pills from a legitimate pharmacy, and then c) Swallows the pills on a schedule as specifically directed by the physician. Using this definition, if any element of this 3-stage process is absent then such consumption would be
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