Call Of The Wild Violence Analysis

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In the definitive novel, The Call of the Wild, written by Jack London, the author uses the motif of Violence to support the overall theme in the novel, “survival of the fittest.” Jack London opens his book up with the original setting of the Gold Rush of 1897. London begins his book with a setting, expounding the original master of Buck and where he used to live. Buck is brought into the story when he is kidnapped, playing the role of the alpha-dog. He is taken to the Yukon Territory, where he discovers that he must adapt to the surroundings in order to survive. Throughout the novel of London’s, Buck is faced among many other dogs, and the competition to survive is exceptionally heavy. He eventually continues to adapt to the surroundings, and he knows there is only one way to survive, you must kill or get killed.
An example that Jack London uses the motif of Violence to support the theme of survival of the fittest, is when Buck
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In this battle, Buck and Spitz face-off in order to survive their journey through the Klondike. This event emphasizes the idea that in order for one to survive, one may need to exhibit their dominance through violence. Furthermore, London once again presents the motif of violence in when he writes about Buck’s attack on the Yeehats. London exhibits this idea when he shows that Buck attacks the Yeehats to avenge the death of his last owner. Due to the remorse of Buck’s last owner, he knew that the Yeehats overpowered his team with their weapons. Buck attacks the Yeehats, and he was determined to survive, unlike his team. To do this, he had to use the one and major factor of survival, utilize the power of violence. To sum it all up, London demonstrates that Buck must array his power through violence to becoming the fittest for
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