Captain America Film Analysis

1247 Words5 Pages
Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War is probably one of Marvel’s most popular movies – for the simple reason that they have made it appeal to nearly everyone. Civil War is not just another one of those superhero movies where the heroes fight each other because the writers have run out of villains. Civil War is both a toast to past politics, and a response to the political anxieties of today. To be considered Political Cinema, Civil War needs to satisfy three basic categories: it needs to comment on political events, systems, or theories; have accurate illustrations of political atmospheres; and make people question their view of politics to warn them about certain policies. Civil War is a great political film because it not only satisfies…show more content…
The call for the unmasking of anonymous superheros is eerily similar to a recent call to reveal the names of anonymous donors to various organizations. Other themes, like the issues of government control and corrupt and lazy bureaucrats, are also common. What is better, freedom, or safety? According to Benjamin Franklin, “Any society that will give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.” The alternate point of view, as in this quote by Gertrude Himmerfarb, thinks that “Liberty also corrupts, and absolute freedom corrupts absolutely.” Both are valid opinions, and Civil War does an admirable job of expressing both sides in a way that allows those with open minds to understand…show more content…
The issues they address – government control versus freedom, and how to deal with each – are things that people worry about every day. Another great issue that especially involves politics is the public opinion. With social media and communication so easy to access these days, it is very easy for mass public interest to sway a politician’s vote one way or another. In Captain America: Civil War, it is the public fear of uncontrollable heroes running unchecked through the world that prompts the United Nations to draft the Accords that started the whole mess. Just as important today is the issue of police control. Superheros are, in essence, the policemen of the world. In America especially, the police are being discussed and regulated because of a few instances where police abused their power. There is also the issue of national sovereignty. When should a large country take it upon themselves to step in to help a smaller one, even if the smaller country does not want help? Civil War portrays this through the conflict of Tony Stark and Steve Rogers. Stark thinks that the Avengers should not be allowed to go anywhere they want unchecked, while Rogers believes that ‘the best hands are their own’ and that they should not be regulated by governments with agendas. There are many different opinions on this topic, and Civil War’s ability to cater to both sides of the metaphorical bridge made the
Open Document