Caribbean Colonialism Analysis

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Many writers from the Caribbean now live in other parts of the world, ranging from the old colonial centers such as France and Britain to the other parts of the Americas, such as the USA and Canada. These writers often thematize the experience of exile and diaspora and of adapting their Caribbean (creole) heritage to the new environment. Among the most prominent of these writers are Caryl Phillips and the Trinidadians, V.S. Naipaul and Samuel Selvon, who are of East Indian descent. As a postcolonial writer, Selvon works look at or address the following: a. Colonial representation of the native, b. The epistemological underpinnings (colonial histories, cartography, anthropology, area studies), c. The feminization, marginalization and dehumanization…show more content…
Re-visioning of the tragic history like slave trade and indentured labourers, and g. Transition of ‘new society,’ ‘new identity,’ and ‘new world’ (creole and hybrid). Very basically, and in a literary context, postcolonialism involves one or more of the following. John McLeod in his work Beginning of Postcolonialism explains the three elements that postcolonialism entails: a. Reading texts produced by writers from countries with a history of colonialism, primarily, those texts which are concerned with the workings and legacy of colonialism in the past or the present. b. Reading texts produced by those who have migrated from countries with a history of colonialism or those descended from migrant families, which deal in the main with diaspora experience and its many consequences. c. In the light of theories of colonial discourse, re-reading texts produced during colonialism; both those that directly address the experiences of empire, and those that seem not to. (Beginning of Postcolonialism,…show more content…
Selvon, viewed generally as a postcolonial writer, subverts the imperial perspective created from the tension of colonial legacy. He creates new fictions which generate new ways of perceiving human relationships between different races. The challenge for them as postcolonial writers is to strip the implicit class and racial biases, de-mythologise the stereotyped notions that threaten to define
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