Cassandra In The Trojan Women

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Woman of Owu adds a rational reason for the slave trade and clearly points out that human beings, rather than the gods, are the reason behind the war. In the second scene, the women repeatedly say ”we are on our own” and conclude that ”we create war.” When placing lines like these early in the drama, Osofisan guides the reception towards an emphasis on human beings rather than on the gods. The links between gods and humans are the priests, in Greek and Yoruba religion alike. Cassandra in The Trojan Women is such a priest. In Osofisan’s adaptation, Cassandra’s counterpart is Orisaye. Osofisan follows Euripides’s play rather closely, and Orisaye’s frenzy, too, is seen by the other characters as madness. In particular, her own mother, Erelu Afin,…show more content…
When told that they are to leave, his female characters, lament those not buried. Thus they appeal to Erelu to “save our future” consequently Erelu’s accepts the task of leading the newly dead to the land of the ancestors. Accompanied by sekere, a gong, and drums in the wings, and by the choir singing ”We dance for those who fell for greed of power,” Erelu goes into a ritual that calls upon the ancestors this definitely shows the great dependency of human existence on the gods. In his article “Ritual and Revolutionary Ethos, Osofisan explains that a “wedding of ritual form and revolutionary ethos should be possible” in the theatre, given that the divine powers are understood as metaphors. In Women of Owu, he amply demonstrates that it is possible, and the play makes sure that all Readers perceive the gods and the ritual as fictional and as metaphors explains that a “wedding of ritual form and revolutionary ethos should be possible” in the theatre, given that the divine powers are understood as metaphors. In Women of Owu, he amply demonstrates that it is possible, and the play makes sure that all Readers perceive the gods and the ritual as fictional and as
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